Last edited by Samurn
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

1 edition of Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia found in the catalog.

Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia

Allen J. Frank

Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia

Sufism, education, and the paradox of islamic prestige

by Allen J. Frank

  • 81 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Brill in Leiden, Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sufism,
  • Muslims,
  • Islam

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementBy Allen J. Frank
    SeriesBrill"s inner Asian library -- v. 26
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBP63.R8 F73 2012
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25367633M
    ISBN 109789004232884, 9789004234901
    LC Control Number2012025551

    The Russian conquest of Bukhara was a series of wars, invasions, and the subsequent conquest of the Central Asian Emirate of Bukhara by the Russian Empire.. War. The nomads of central Asia, who had produced great conquerors in the distant past, were little match for .   Home to one of the world’s oldest and, in centuries past, biggest Jewish communities, Bukhara now has a Muslim population of more than , people but, according to .

      Relations between Muslims and the Russian government have long been a source of tension and never more so than today. This penetrating examination of the conflict between the central authority of the Russian Empire and its Muslim regions before, during and immediately after the Russian Revolution, illuminates this important s: 1. For Muslims in Russia Bukhara's prestige was manifested in genealogies, fashion, and in the elevated legal status of Bukharan communities in Russia. The historical relationship of Russia's Muslim communities with Bukhara was founded above all on Bukhara's reputation as a holy city of Islam, an abode of great Sufis, and a center of Islamic.

    The Agrzhan(Russian: Агрыжанские татары) were a group of primarily Muslim merchants from India who operated in they numbered Since then they have assimilated into the Astrakhan Tatar population.. At least some of the earliest Agrzhan were Hindus. They were closely connected with the Bukharan merchants in Astrakhan, and part of the trade network. From the 16th to the 18th century, Bukhara became part of the Bukhara Khanate (Kingdom). Eventually, the ‘Great Game' between the Russian and English empires caused Russia to take Bukhara (and Khiva, and other Uzbek regions) into its control (). By , the communists-soviets had overthrown the Russian empire.


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Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia by Allen J. Frank Download PDF EPUB FB2

For Muslims in Russia Bukhara’s prestige was manifested in genealogies, fashion, and in the elevated legal status of Bukharan communities in Russia. Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia book historical relationship of Russia’s Muslim communities with Bukhara was founded above all on Bukhara’s reputation as a holy city of Islam, an abode of great Sufis, and a center of Islamic Cited by:   For Muslims in Russia Bukhara's prestige was manifested in genealogies, fashion, and in the elevated legal status of Bukharan communities in Russia.

The historical relationship of Russia's Muslim communities with Bukhara was founded above all on Bukhara's reputation as a holy city of Islam, an abode of great Sufis, and a center of Islamic Cited by:   In Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia, Frank ably evokes for us the shifting contours of Bukhara’s prestige among Tatars and Bashkirs over the last few centuries: and if the book ultimately ends up raising more questions than it answers, it thereby does the invaluable service of helping to stimulate our thinking about the dynamics of status Author: Thomas Welsford.

In Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia Allen Frank examines the relationship between Muslims in Russia and the city of Bukhara, examining paradoxes emerging the city s Sufism-based Islamic prestige, and the emergence of Islamic reformism in Russia.

For Muslims in Russia Bukhara's prestige was manifested in genealogies, fashion, and in the elevated legal status of Bukharan communities in Russia.

The historical relationship of Russia's Muslim communities with Bukhara was founded above all on Bukhara's reputation as a holy city of Islam, an abode of great Sufis, and a center of Islamic 5/5(1).

Download bukhara and the muslims of russia ebook free in PDF and EPUB Format. bukhara and the muslims of russia also available in docx and mobi. Read bukhara and the muslims of russia online, read in mobile or Kindle. "Introduction" published on 01 Jan by Brill.

Welcome to Brill's new website, which replaces our Books & Journals platform. If you had a personal account on the old platform, click ian administrators click here.

"Conclusion" published on 01 Jan by Brill. For Muslims in Russia Bukhara’s prestige was manifested in genealogies, fashion, and in the elevated legal status of Bukharan communities in Russia. The historical relationship of Russia’s Muslim communities with Bukhara was founded above all on Bukhara’s reputation as a holy city of Islam, an abode of great Sufis, and a center of Islamic.

(). Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia: Sufism, education, and the paradox of Islamic prestige. Central Asian Survey: Vol.

32, Negotiating Well-being in Central Asia, pp. Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia: Sufism, Education, and the Paradox of Islamic Prestige (Brill's Inner Asian Library) by Allen J.

Frank Hardcover, Pages, Published ISBN / ISBN / In "Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia" Allen Frank examines the relationship of Tatars and Bashkirs. Bukhara (Uzbek: Buxoro; Persian: بخارا ‎) is a city in a is rich in historical sites, with about architectural monuments.

The city served as the capital of the Samanid empire and Khanate of Bukhara and was the birthplace of Imam Bukhari. The nation's fifth-largest city, it had a population ofas of 31 August Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia Book Summary: In Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia Allen Frank examines the relationship between Muslims in Russia and the city of Bukhara, examining paradoxes emerging the city’s Sufism-based Islamic prestige, and the emergence of Islamic reformism in Russia.

[International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Schorlarly Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences] Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia.

Sufism, education, and the paradox of islamic prestige. Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. History. Inthe Russian Empire forced the Emirate of Bukhara to accept protectorate status. Over the next 40 years, the Russians slowly eroded at Bukhara's territory, although never actually annexing the city of Bukhara itself.

However, the emir could not shut out all outside influences, and gradually some of the disaffected youth of Bukhara gravitated to Pan-Turkism, inspired by the. InRussian troops took over Tashkent, and there was a large influx of Jews to the newly created Turkestan Region. From toJews were free to practice Judaism.

Dozens of Bukharan Jews held prestigious jobs in medicine, law, and government, and many Jews prospered. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. "In Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia Allen Frank examines the relationship of Tatars and Bashkirs with the city of Bukhara during the Russian Imperial era.

For Muslims in Russia Bukhara's prestige was manifested in genealogies, fashion, and in the elevated legal status of Bukharan communities in Russia. The Emirate of Bukhara (Persian: امارت بخارا ‎; Uzbek: Buxoro amirligi) was an Uzbek state that existed from to in what is now modern-day Uzbekistan and occupied the land between the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers, known formerly as core territory was the land along the lower Zarafshan River, and its urban centres were the ancient cities of.

Russian Turkestan (Russian: Русский Туркестан, romanized: Russkiy Turkestan) was the western part of Turkestan within the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories, and was administered as a Krai or comprised the oasis region to the south of the Kazakh Steppe, but not the protectorates of the Emirate of Bukhara and the Khanate of Khiva.The Khanate of Bukhara (or Khanate of Bukhoro) (Persian: خانات بخارا ‎; Uzbek: Buxoro Xonligi) was an Uzbek state from the second quarter of the 16th century to the late 18th century in Central Asia or Turkestan.

Bukhara became the capital of the short-lived Shaybanid empire during the reign of Ubaydallah Khan (–). The khanate reached its greatest extent and influence.According to one of their legends, Bukharan Jews consider themselves to be descended from members of the Ten Tribes of Israel who, after the seizure of Israel in /— B.C.

by the Assyrians, were driven deep into the Assyrian empire. They associate one particular place in Assyria in which they settled, Habor, mentioned in the Bible (2 Kings ), with Bukhara; the identity of.